Philip Sallon

New Talk Art!!! We meet London icon PHILIP SALLON at his home in St John's Wood!!! A legendary British club promoter, event organiser, socialite, style innovator, impresario, and clothing designer. He was born in London, England where he still lives and works today in his 70th year. He is particularly known for being a prominent member of the Punk sub-cultural and New Romantic pop cultural movements during the 1970s and 1980s.


We discuss how he witnessed the birth of Punk, his friendship with Vivienne Westwood, the Blitz Kids and Boy George, more than 5 decades of his drawings, invitations and designs, supporting young graffiti artists back in 1983 all the way to more contemporary street artists like Stik and Ben Eine.


Philip Sallon was born in London in 1951, the grandson of Polish Jewish immigrant tailors who moved to the UK in 1904. His father, Ralph Sallon, was a well-known caricaturist who married his mother Anna Simon in 1945. They had one son (Philip) and three daughters. He was educated at Harrow County School, later renamed Gayton school. In 1970 he enrolled on an arts foundation course at East Ham College. In 1975 he applied and was offered a place at Saint Martin's School of Art to study fashion.


He then left St Martins to pursue a career in theatre and later club promotion. Sallon founded the Mud Club in Tottenham Court Road in the 1980s and is best known for his style and outgoing personality. Admirers describe how during one club night in the 1980s he wore a dress made entirely of pound notes; by the end of the evening, after fellow clubbers had helped themselves, he was practically naked.


For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. For all requests, please email talkart@independenttalent.com


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