Taster: #57 From mayor to meat market. Getting elected in the 18th Century

Taster for #57 - 'Partisan Politics - Looking for Consensus in Eighteenth Century Towns' by Jon Rosebank, has just been published by Exeter University Press. Woo hoo!! 45% discount on Publications page of our website.
At least until the 1990s historian Lewis Namier’s shadow loomed so heavily over the 18th century that that period – unlike any other - was still being written largely from the papers of central government and the gentry. Historians still considered the period, in the title of a well-thumbed textbook, the ‘aristocratic century.’ According to Namier, for example, the gentry bought their way into a parliamentary seat, mainly by purchasing land, or by gaining the approval of some unrepresentative local patron who had the borough in his pocket. Well, Jon's 1985 doctoral thesis, researched entirely from local documents rescued from mouldy parish chests and corporation vaults, contradicted Namier so baldly that although Jon was awarded his doctorate he could never publish. But now that the old Namier orthodoxy has collapsed and everyone agrees with Jon, he’s been able to bring out his book. It shows just how far the ordinary people of eighteenth century Britain ran rings around the gentry and aristocracy and ran things for themselves. 'Partisan Politics - Looking for Consensus in Eighteenth Century Towns' by Jon Rosebank, has just been published by Exeter University Press. Woo hoo!! 45% discount on Publications page of our website.At least until the 1990s historian Lewis Namier’s shadow loomed so heavily over the 18th century that that period – unlike any other - was still being written largely from the papers of central government and the gentry. Historians still considered the period, in the title of a well-thumbed textbook, the ‘aristocratic century.’ According to Namier, for example, the gentry bought their way into a parliamentary seat, mainly by purchasing land, or by gaining the approval of some unrepresentative local patron who had the borough in his pocket. Well, Jon's 1985 doctoral thesis, researched entirely from local documents rescued from mouldy parish chests and corporation vaults, contradicted Namier so baldly that although Jon was awarded his doctorate he could never publish. But now that the old Namier orthodoxy has collapsed and everyone agrees with Jon, he’s been able to bring out his book. It shows just how far the ordinary people of eighteenth century Britain ran rings around the gentry and aristocracy and ran things for themselves.