#109 Discover the Joy of Movement with Dr Kelly McGonigal

One of the positives I’m seeing during the current lockdown is many people’s renewed appreciation for getting out, active and connected. Having to stay home is making us really value that small window in our days when we can step outside to exercise, interact with nature and say a (distanced) hello to people we pass on the street or in the park.

For that reason, I think you’re going to love listening to my guest on this week’s podcast. Kelly McGonigal is a US research psychologist, a lecturer at Stanford University and an author. Kelly and I talk about the importance of music for movement, and how moving with others can improve social connections and foster a sense of support and community. We discuss how going beyond what you think you’re capable of – whether that’s an endurance event, lifting heavy weights or taking on an epic hike in nature – can provide a spiritual experience that changes the brain in positive ways.

If doesn’t have to be hard, though. Kelly explains how even the simplest of movements provide an immediate reset for your mood and brain chemistry. And she shares ground-breaking new research that shows how repeatedly contracting any muscles, through continuous exercise, releases antidepressant substances called myokines that scientists have dubbed ‘hope molecules’.

Whether you’re someone who wants to move more but isn’t sure where to start – or you’re already a confirmed fitness fanatic – I think you’ll find this conversation uplifting.

Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/109

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